Spring 2015

Watch Now
Half Moon Gardens and the McKay Agricultural Research Station serve as a direct extension of the 225 acre campus, providing the community with both educational and entrepreneurial opportunities.
EXPERIENCE UNITY
EXPLORE UNITY
SHARE UNITY
SEE THE BIG PICTURE
EXPERIENCE UNITY
Loading

The course offerings below are for Spring 2015. Theme-based course descriptions are also listed. A comprehensive list of courses offered at Unity College is found on The Unity College Catalog

Unity College Courses for Spring 2015

 
Spring 2015 Course Offerings - A complete list of course offerings for Spring 2015.
 

Theme-based Course Descriptions Spring 2015

EDUCATOR’S BLOCK FOR ABEE AND AT STUDENTS

The experiential educators block is a set of courses worth 13 – 15 credits that students are registered for at the same time.  Students in the block may not register for any additional courses in the same semester.  This is done to allow integration of material from different courses, to create large blocks of time for immersive experiences, and to allow flexible scheduling for service work with partner organizations.  Students are expected to be available for course activities at least 4 days a week from 8am until 5pm throughout the semester.  The block will also include some multi-night trips.  Students who wish to register for the block must attend an informational meeting in the fall and meet with the registrar. The Educator’s Block includes the following courses:  AE 1003, AE 1012, AE 2002, AE 2012, OS 1061, and PY 2113.  Most students also enroll in the optional course AE 1072.
Credits:  13-15
Prerequisites:  Must be an ABEE or AT major
 

AR 2113-01 CREATIVE WRITING – WORD AND IMAGE

In this experiential course, students improve their use of writing techniques such as voice, figurative language and imagery, while experimenting with different types of short fiction. Since the course satisfies the Arts requirement, at least one piece of writing will be combined with visual components in order to show how text and image can work together aesthetically. Emphasis will be placed on revision and presentation in a productive, supportive workshop environment.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  CM 1003
 

AR 3103-01 ART EXPLORATIONS: EXPERIMENTAL 2-D MEDIA

This course is an investigation into the use of non-traditional and experimental materials and techniques to produce two-dimensional artwork. We will investigate how the connotations and associations of the materials used affect the content of the artwork. We will consider issues of scale, repetition, installation and public art.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  Sophomore status
 

AR 3103-01 ART EXPLORATIONS: FOUNDATIONS OF DIGITAL DESIGN

This course will provide students with a practical and conceptual foundation in the formal elements that underlie all visual art, within a fully digital imaging environment. We will apply the principles of visual organization as they relate to both decorative and illusionary space. Utilizing the latest Adobe CC software students will become conversant with the elements of shape, line, value, texture, and color; as well as a working vocabulary of art terms.  We will focus on CC programs; Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign, in a project-oriented environment.  A textbook and a web domain host will be required for this course.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  Sophomore status
 

BI 1213-01  BIOLOGY IN PRACTICE: FOOD SCIENCE

All animals eat, but we humans have developed countless ways to modify our food to suit our tastes and to make it last longer.  In this course we'll explore some of the science behind how we create, preserve, and test our foods.  Through making cheese, yogurt, and fermented tea we'll learn about enzymes, fermentation, and microbiology.  We'll use molecular biology techniques to test for Salmonella and for GMO ingredients.  After learning all these lab skills, students will choose one of our projects to develop further with their own experimental questions.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BI 1114  
 

BI 1213-02  BIOLOGY IN PRACTICE:  WINTER ECOLOGY

This course will focus on the ecology of winter habitats. This will combine lecture, readings, field activities and an oral presentation. Field activities will explore the winter environment and investigate ecological questions. There will be high levels of physical exertion possible (hiking, snowshoeing) in winter conditions.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites:  BI 1114
 

BI 2111 THEMES IN FISHERIES AND AQUACULTURE-PLECOPTERA OF WALDO COUNTY

Plecoptera, the stoneflies, are an interesting taxa of aquatic insects widely dispersed and often considered to be indicators of good stream water quality. Although numerous species are known in Maine, few records are documented in Waldo County. This class will collect adult stoneflies streamside and complete as many species identifications as possible as a pilot for a county wide citizen science assessment of Plecoptera including springs and seep high in watersheds to the highest order streams in or bordering the county including Penobscot River and Sebasticook River. Emphasis S 2015 will be on Northwestern Waldo County steams including springs and seeps as well as all temporary and permanent streams tributary to 25 Mile Stream. Specimens with uncertain taxonomic affinity will be submitted for final identification to regional and international taxonomists as Dr. R. W. Baumann at Brighan Young University, Dr. Stanley Szczytko at University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point, and Dr. Boris Kondratieff at Colorado State University.
Credits:  1
Prerequisites:  BI 1114
 

BI 3263 SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOLOGY-TOPICS IN AQUACULTURE

Students will consider the many sorts of aquaculture practiced for sport fishing and sport fishing restoration; commercial fishing and commercial fishing restoration; and including aquaculture for algae, aquatic plants, mollusks, crustacean, and finfish. Trips to local or regional aquaculture facilities will supplement practical applications including small studies in the KH tank room as well as design if not implementation of a hydroponic finfish and herb production system at McKay Field Station.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BI 1114, MA 2243, and BI 2004 or WF2433
 

CL 2881 INTERNATIONAL WILDLIFE TRAFFICKING

From elephants and tigers, to rare timber and reptiles, the illegal trade in wildlife and plant is a growing international problem, and one of the leading threats to species conservation. It is also a business that generates hundreds of millions of dollars for smugglers, corrupt officials, and international crime organizations. Though estimates vary, some experts place it a close second in size to international drug trafficking. This course will examine international wildlife trafficking in its legal context, through a case based survey of relevant U.S. and international law. We will identify and examine the role of U.S. federal and state conservation law enforcement, in addition to the role of international agencies and conservation groups. Upon completion of the course, students will have an informed understanding of the legal complexities of international wildlife law enforcement.
Credits:  1
Prerequisites:  Sophomore status
 

EH 3213 PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL WRITING: WRITING FOR A LAY AUDIENCE

This class is designed to develop writing skills. We will focus on creating clear and concise prose about scientific research for a non-scientific (general) audience. It is unlikely that many students in this class will choose a career in writing. But it is likely that all will depend heavily on writing in any career – especially in the sciences. The better you write, the better you will do in your career, whatever it may be. Whether working on a news article, press release, scientific journal article, personal letter, memorandum, e-mail message, or a job or grant application (etc., etc., etc.), your aim will be to write clear, accurate prose with vitality and style. 
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: CM 1013
 

ES 2001 TECHNIQUES IN THE ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES: WINTER TREE IDENTIFICATION

This course is designed to hone identifications skills of woody plants with an emphasis on trees native to New England during the dormant season. We will learn to identify woody species utilizing buds, bark, form and position in the landscape. Students will come away from the class with a basic understanding of tree anatomy, identification and forest ecology. This is a completely field based course.
Credits:  1
Prerequisites:  None
 

ES 2002 TECHNIQUES IN THE ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES: MEASURING BIODIVERSITY

The main aim of this course is to introduce a number of approaches and methods that are currently used in both actual and historical analyses of biodiversity and evolution. Students will engage in discussions of the social and ecological complexities of biodiversity conservation in different ecosystems and cultures. Learning outcomes include a variety of methodologies from the biological and social sciences to evaluate the causes, consequences, and solutions to biodiversity loss through the lenses of ecology, culture, and governance. 
Credits: 2
Prerequisites:  None
 

HN 2061 HONORS SEMINAR: HISTORY OF SCIENCE

Students in this one-credit seminar will explore the history of natural sciences through media, discussions, and guest lectures. Questions under consideration may include: How have various cultures defined science?  How did practices like the scientific method, consensus, and falsifiability develop?  What are some competing paradigms in the natural sciences?  How have the natural sciences been influenced by historical trends?
Credits:  1
Prerequisites:  Must be in the Honors Program
 

HU 2021-01  TOPICS IN THE HUMANITIES: THE CAMDEN CONFERENCE

Students will spend the weekend in Camden, Maine and attend the entirety of the 2015 Camden Conference, February 20-22, 2015. The theme for the 2015 conference is “Russia Resurgent” and will focus on environmental issues in Russia. The course will meet for one hour each week for discussion and potential conversation partner with an institution in Russia. The course is offered in partnership with The Camden Conference. For more information: http://www.camden conference.org.
Credits:  1
Prerequisites: None
 

HU 2023-01  TOPIC IN HUMANITIES:HISTORY OF SUSTAINABLE ENERGY

Sustainable energy has often been called “the people’s energy.” Yet one of the great paradoxes of the age is that popular support for sustainable energy is far greater than the practical support given by government or fossil industries or electric utilities.  This course will survey the surprisingly extensive history of sustainable energy from the earliest times, through fears of coal shortages in the 1870s, oil shortages in the 1920s and then through the “energy crisis” years from the 1970s and the climate crisis today. 
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: None
 

HU 2121-01 TOPICS IN HUMANITIES: ART AND SUSTAINABILITY SCIENCE GALLERY SERIES

From cave paintings to landscapes, art has long been one of the most powerful ways to communicate our love for the natural world.  But now art is increasingly important as a way to identify environmental problems and imagine their solutions.   The course will consist primarily of attendance at several area art shows (6:00-9:00 PM on January 22, February 12, March 12, April 16).  Travel will be provided.
Credits: 1
Prerequisites:  None
 

HU 2221-01 TOPICS IN HUMANITIES: SUSTAINABILITY SCIENCE BOOK CLUB

Read an amazing book a month.  Get together over snacks and talk about it.  What a powerfully simple idea.  Sustainability Science requires perspective that goes beyond “just the facts.” And reading well-crafted novels, creative non-fiction, short stories, and memoirs is a wonderful way to put science into the larger societal, personal, and historical context.  Titles may include works like “I’m With the Bears,” “The Monkey Wrench Gang”, “Unscientific America,” or “Facing the Change.”  Class meets January 28, February 18, April 8, and April 29.
Credits: 1
Prerequisites:  None
 

HU 2321-01 TOPICS IN HUMANITIES: SUSTAINABILITY SCIENCE DOCUMENTARY FILM SERIES

Watch films and meet the filmmakers!  Documentary film has emerged as one of the most important and powerful ways to communicate environmental problems and help society imagine their solutions.  This course will consist primarily of attendance at the CIFF Selects: Sustainability Science Documentary Film Series at the Unity College Center for the Performing Arts (6-9 PM on February 5; March 5; and April 2).  This course and film series is presented in partnership with the Camden International Film Festival (CIFF).
Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
 

HU 3033- 01 ADVANCED TOPICS IN HUMANITIES: WORLD RELIGIONS AND THE ENVIRONMENT

If ignorance of the world’s diverse religious heritage ever was an option, it no longer is. The US is now the most religiously diverse nation in the world. Whether we distance ourselves from religious traditions or embrace them, we can’t avoid the influence of religious ideas in our everyday lives. In particular, peoples’ religious and spiritual attitudes strongly affect their approach to environmental issues. In this course we will read, interpret, and discuss important writings from the Christian, Hindu, Buddhist, Jewish, Islamic, Native American, and other religious traditions. How do people understand the ultimate reality? What are their myths, symbols, rituals, and ethics?  What are the commonalities as well as the differences? What are the possibilities in each tradition for environmental action? You’ll think empathetically and also critically about various religious claims and explore your personal responses. Music and film, guest presenters, and experiences with local religious congregations will also be featured.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: CM1013 and Sophomore status
 

MA 2003 APPLICATIONS IN MATH: FERNS AND FRACTALS

Have you ever noticed the pattern on a pineapple, or the way a leaf grows, the spiral of a seashell, or the shape of a snowflake?  Would you believe these are mathematical phenomena?  In this course, we will explore the mathematics of the natural world around us, and in doing so, gain an appreciation for the elegance of mathematics and its relevance to many aspects of life. Topic will include the Fibonacci sequence, the Golden Ratio, exponential growth, fractal patterns, symmetry, and compass and straightedge construction. 
Final project required.
Credits:   3
Prerequisites:  LR1123
 

PY 2881 INTRODUCTION TO ECOPSYCHOLOGY

Ecopsychology exists at the confluence of mental health and nature. This course offers an initial survey of this developing field with a particular emphasis on exploring its history, prominent figures and practitioners, related psychology subfields, and its mixture of seminar, small groups, and lecture. Participants are invited to engage in self- reflection and group dialogue around the text, selected readings, and activities.  Students will be required to complete readings prior to the first class. This course will meet in person for one weekend at the start of the semester and then will continue online (until week 7) with posted readings and moderated discussion. Students are expected to be sufficiently self-directed to manage this nontraditional course structure. 
Credits:  1
Prerequisites: PY 1013
 

UC 4501 E.S. SEMINAR: BUCKET BRIGADE AND MANAGEMENT OF EXOTIC INVASIVE FISHES

This seminar will consider the unauthorized introduction of fishes into new habitats. What are the species introduced? Why those species? What are implications to native of previously managed fish communities? How to exploit introduced fish? How to control or manage introduced fishes? What may be impact of reintroductions of once native fish to habitats from which once native species were long isolated by dams or other channel obstructions?
Credits:  1
Prerequisites: Junior status
 

UC 4501 E.S. SEMINAR: IMPLICATIONS AND MANAGEMENT OF ECOLOGICAL CHANGE

This seminar course will examine the conservation and natural resource management issues associated with ongoing rapid global change.  The class will investigate the roles of climate disruption and land use change as the primary drivers of ecological change.  Participants will review the relevant primary literature and develop a report based on their choice of topic.  Students will develop transdisciplinary skills in problem focused critical analysis.  This course will serve as a means of meeting learning outcomes for the domains of science and social science.   STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO SIGN UP FOR THIS COURSE DIRECTLY WITH THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE.
Credits: 1
Prerequisites:  Junior Status and 2.8 cumulative grade point average.
 
Top Banner