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Jennifer L. Cartier

Jennifer L. Cartier

Director of Teacher Education and Associate Professor of Science Education/ Center for Experiential and Environmental Education

Jennifer Cartier - Director of Teacher Education and Associate Professor of Science Education Unity College
Phone: 207-509-7282
Email: jcartier@unity.edu
Office: 216 Founders Hall South

An experienced science teacher educator, Cartier most recently served as Director of Teacher Education at the University of Pittsburgh, School of Education.  She has designed and taught 19 different courses related to science pedagogy, curriculum theory and design. She holds a Ph.D. in Curriculum & Instruction (Science Education) from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, an M.S. in Biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a B.A. from Williams College.

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Janis Bragan Balda

Janis Bragan Balda

Associate Professor of Sustainable Enterprise/ Center for Sustainability and Global Change

Unity College Associate Professor of Sustainable Enterprise Janis Balda
Phone: 207-509-7260
Email: jbalda@unity.edu
Office: Founders Hall South, Office 206
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Geologists graduating from the Unity EES program are extensively trained to interpret the physical landscape, conduct a variety of field-oriented tasks and lab work, perform quantitative analyses on field data, and share the results of their work with outside audiences.
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Kevin Spigel

Kevin Spigel

Associate Professor of Geoscience/ Center for Sustainability and Global Change

Unity College Associate Professor Kevin Spigel
Phone: 207-509-7215
Email: kspigel@unity.edu
Office: Koons Hall, Office 115

Academic Background

PhD, Physical Geography, University of Wisconsin Madison
MS, Physical Geography, University of Wisconsin Madison
BS, Environmental Science, University of Buffalo

Kevin was born in Minnesota and after a year living in the land of 10,000 lakes moved to a small town in western New York situated in the lake effect snowbelt. The abundance of snow and surrounding mountains provided a lot of outdoor recreation opportunities including skiing and mountain biking. After graduating from high school, Kevin attended the University of Buffalo where he received degrees in Environmental Science and Physical Geography. As an undergraduate student, Kevin worked closely with his mentor as an undergraduate research assistant on two separate projects: (1) bedload transport in high shear stress environments, and (2) bedload transport under laminar flow conditions with and without simulated rainfall. These research opportunities helped shift Kevin’s career path from ski-bum to academia.

After graduating from college, Kevin attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he received both his M.S. and Ph.D. in Physical Geography. Kevin also obtained a minor in Small Watershed Design and Engineering. For his M.S. work, Kevin was hired by the Forest Service as a Hydrologic Technician and spent two summers working in Montana, Idaho, Nevada, and Colorado studying the effects of wildfire on hillslope erosion. Part of this work also focused on using computer models to predict postfire erosion rates as well assess the effectiveness of different treatment/rehabilitation methods. For his Ph.D. work, Kevin expanded his interests in hillslope hydrology to include larger basins and longer time scales and began studying lake sediment cores as archives of environmental change. By studying fossil pollen, charcoal, environmental magnetics, and organic matter content Kevin was able to reconstruct environmental patterns in southern Wisconsin extending back to ~14,000 years. Lake sediment research forms the foundation for much of his current research.

At Unity College, Kevin teaches a variety of courses in the Geosciences and strives to uphold his teaching philosophy of “Learn by Doing”. In all of his courses, Kevin blends theory with application in an effort to provide students with the field, lab, and research skills needed to succeed in the real world. All of his courses have lab components to immerse students in more detail related to topics of study. Kevin emphasizes the use of quantitative analysis and widespread use of technology (computer models, GIS, data-logging) in his courses. Research opportunities in the Geosciences abound for students at Unity College. In many courses, especially upper level courses, students participate in class research projects that include studying hillslope erosion on campus and also studying the effects of precipitation on streamflow and groundwater levels. Students also participate with faculty-sponsored research outside of class on the many facets of lake sediment analysis.

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Tom Mullin

Tom Mullin

Associate Professor, Parks and Forest Resources/ Center for Natural Resource Management and Protection

Unity College Associate Professor Tom Mullin
Phone: 207-509-7291
Email: tmullin@unity.edu
Office: Founders Hall South, Office 201

Academic Background

MAIS, Interpretive Services Management, George Mason University
BS, Horticulture, Virginia Tech

Tom Mullin is currently an Associate Professor at Unity College. He joined the faculty in the fall of 1999 and serves as the program contact for the Parks and Forest Resources major.  A founder and life member of the National Association for Interpretation (NAI), he was awarded the Fellow Award by NAI in 2003 and received National Meritorious Service awards twice in the past as well as numerous other national and regional awards.

Past offices and elected positions held with NAI include Vice President of Administration, Vice President of Programs, a founder and director of the College and University Academics Section (three terms), Chair of the Section Leadership Council (four years) and Section Representative to the Board of Directors (three years). He is currently the Regional Director for the Northeast Region of the Association as well as serving as an at large member of the National Board of Directors.

Previous professional experience includes time as the Executive Director of an environmental learning center and a land trust in New Hampshire, manager of a municipal nature center in Virginia, Maine Project Learning Tree Coordinator and work as a consultant on a book as well as interpretive planning and training.

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George Matula, Jr.

George Matula, Jr.

Associate Professor of Wildlife Biology/ Center for Natural Resource Management and Protection

Unity College Associate Professor George Matula, Jr.
Phone: 207-509-7206
Email: gmatula@unity.edu
Office: Koons Hall, Office 130

Academic Background

PhD, Forest Resources with Physiology minor, Pennsylvania State University
MS, Wildlife Management, Pennsylvania State University
BA, Biology, Elmhurst College Contact Information

George joined the Unity College faculty in August 2011 as Associate Professor of Wildlife Biology after serving with the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife (MDIFW) for 30 years. He joined MDIFW in 1981 as the Bear Study Leader where he defused a volatile situation between MDIFW and Maine’s bear hunters and guides; he also developed Maine’s current approach to bear research and management. In 1983 and 1984, George served as the Big Game Project Leader and was responsible for the administration, planning, and supervision of a broad range of big game research studies (deer, moose, bear, and turkey), and helped establish the current any-deer approach to deer management in Maine.

George assumed the position of Wildlife Research Supervisor in 1984, where he supervised a staff of 16 biologists and was involved in planning, coordinating, and managing the statewide wildlife research program. He played a major role in revising the species planning process including developing the nationally recognized management system approach to guide fish and wildlife management decisions. He was also instrumental in developing a more biologically and objectively based approach to the endangered and threatened species listing process and for integrating endangered, threatened, and nongame species management responsibilities throughout the fabric of the department.

In 2004, George became the Endangered Species Coordinator and Wildlife Planner. In that capacity he co-developed Maine’s Wildlife Action Plan, guided the department through a major revision of Maine’s list of endangered and threatened species and the delisting of the bald eagle, and was involved in several regional and national initiatives, including serving as Chair of the Northeast Fish and Wildlife Diversity Technical Committee.

George holds a Ph.D. in Forest Resources and a M.S. degree in Wildlife Management from the Pennsylvania State University, and a B.A. in Biology from Elmhurst College in Illinois.

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Erika Latty

Erika Latty

Interm Center Director of Biodiversity / Associate Professor of Botany/ Center for Biodiversity

Erika Latty - Interm Center Director of Biodiversity / Associate Professor of Botany Unity College
Phone: 207-509-7118
Email: elatty@unity.edu
Office: Koons Hall, Office 129

Academic Background

PhD, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Cornell University
BA, Biology Harvard University

Erika is a forest ecologist whose research focuses on the effects of human accelerated environmental changes in forested ecosystems. She is particularly interested in how introduced forest diseases and pathogens, such as beech bark disease and the hemlock woolly adelgid, impact forest structure and function. Her research program seeks to better understand underlying ecological principles of forest structure and function in order to inform land management practices.

More broadly, Erika is interested in basic and applied botany and plant ecology. She enjoys teaching the plant-related curriculum at Unity and involves students in a variety of service learning projects. Past projects have included conducting plant inventories for the Sebasticook Regional Land Trust and the development of a brochure describing the campus plants of ethnobotanical interest. Under her direction the botany students are updating and enlarging the herbarium collections at the college. She also manages the Unity College greenhouse.

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Cheryl Frederick

Cheryl Frederick

Associate Professor of Captive Wildlife Care and Education/ Center for Experiential and Environmental Education

Associate Professor of Captive Wildlife Care and Education
Phone: 207-509-7184
Email: cfrederick@unity.edu
Office: Koons Hall, Office 133

Academic Background

PhD, Animal Behavior (Psychology), University of Washington
MS, Biology, University of Massachusetts Boston
BS, Psychology, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Cheryl is a native of New England who grew up in Massachusetts. Her initial interest in animal behavior was focused mainly on the study of primates. She worked in various animal laboratories at the University of Massachusetts, but it was the combination of caretaking and research with the schools’ primate colony and internships at New England Regional Primate Center and the American Museum of Natural History in New York that helped her get her first zoo job. The experience and training in research she received as an undergraduate allowed her to initiate behavioral studies in a zoo setting shortly after she began working at the Franklin Park Zoo. Recognition of her work with prosimians led to her quickly becoming a steering committee member of the AZA Prosimian Taxon Advisory Group. Reproduction in a prosimian species was also the subject of her master’s thesis in Biology. Cheryl next took a job as a zookeeper at the Woodland Park Zoo. Again she worked a wide variety of species but focused her efforts and research on one in particular, the Malayan sun bear. She became studbook keeper and then Species Survival Plan (SSP) Chair, serving on the Bear Taxon Advisory Group for over a decade. Once again, the species she took care of and represented nationally and internationally became the subject of her graduate work. Cheryl received her doctorate in Animal Behavior (Psychology) from the University of Washington for her studies on the reproductive behavior and biology of the sun bear. She continues to publish her research and stay involved in conservation work on behalf of this species. Cheryl is currently working as an advisor to a research program in Borneo that hopes to facilitate in situ captive breeding and reintroduction of sun bears to protected forests.

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A minor in Applied Mathematics and Statistics will familiarize students with techniques and applications of mathematical modeling in fields of interest to them.
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Carrie Diaz Eaton

Carrie Diaz Eaton

Associate Professor of Mathematics/ Center for Biodiversity

Unity College Associate Professor Carrie Diaz Eaton
Phone: 207-509-7194
Email: ceaton@unity.edu
Office: Quimby Library, Office LL4

Academic Background

PhD, Mathematical Ecology and Evolutionary Biology University of Tennessee
MS, Interdisciplinary Mathematics University of Maine
BS, Mathematics, Minor in Zoology University of Maine

Carrie Diaz Eaton's interest is in research and teaching in Mathematical Ecology.  Her undergraduate degree from University of Maine was in mathematics, with a minor in Zoology, and worked on models of neurons involved in the sensory whisker system of rats for her honors research.  During her Master's in Interdisciplinary Mathematics, she continued neuromodeling with applications to other mechanosensory systems in crickets. 

Carrie then went to the University of Tennessee to pursue a degree in Mathematical Ecology and Evolutionary Biology where she studied primarily differential equations, probability, modeling for mathematics, and ecology, evolution, population genetics, and speciation, for ecology.  Her research involves modeling how mutualistic interactions between species, such as plant-pollinator relationships, can affect the genetic profile of populations over time. 

Carrie also has a passion for teaching interdisciplinary mathematics and mathematics pedagogy (teaching best practices).  She developed a professional development program at the University of Tennessee in the Mathematics department to improve teaching practices in undergraduate classrooms, and she has taught and developed courses in Calculus for Life Sciences and Modeling Continuous Systems with Applications to Environmental and Life Science.  She stresses that to have a solid foundation in understanding your field, you need to understand the theory, theory that is developed with the language of mathematics.

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Sarah Cunningham

Sarah Cunningham

Associate Professor/Director of the Center for Experiential and Environmental Education/ Center for Experiential and Environmental Education

Sarah Cunningham - Associate Professor/Director of the Center for Experiential and Environmental Education
Phone: 207-509-7266
Email: scunningham@unity.edu
Office: Founders Hall South, Room 214

Academic Background

PhD, Integrative Biology, UC Berkeley
BS, Biology, Brown University

I have been fascinated by animal behavior for as long as I can remember.  As a child I read Jack London and watched Gorillas in the Mist, and my plan was to live in the wilderness with the animals.  However, as I got older I realized that I enjoy human company, too!  In graduate school I studied mammalian social behavior and species with unusual characteristics, such as spotted hyenas and woodrats.  However, I found myself enjoying teaching and animal husbandry as much as I enjoyed the intellectual challenge of research.  After graduate school, I began working at the San Francisco Zoo because it was a place where I could both teach people and work with animals. I worked in the Children’s Zoo and in the carnivore section, and I also helped plan enrichment and training across the zoo.  Unity’s unique Captive Wildlife Care and Education program has brought me back to academia, where I enjoy caring for students and sharing my enthusiasm with them.

When not working, I enjoy training my dog, playing board games, shoveling snow, listening to electronic music, and starting various artistic projects.  Occasionally, I even finish those projects.